Chrome using https as default

Here’s another nail in the coffin for websites that steadfastly refuse to move to HTTPS and SSL. Our favourite WordPress website WP Tavern covered the Chrome 90 update in fine detail, writing:

Chrome’s upcoming version 90 will use https:// by default in the address bar, bringing a significant improvement to security and loading speed. HTTPS adoption has shot up significantly over the past six years after Google announced in 2014 that HTTPS would be used as a ranking signal in search results.

If you’ve been reading our blog for a while you’ll know I’ve been banging on and on about the criticality of using SSL for years. If you do need reminding, check out this story on how not enabling SSL is hurting your site. With the news of Chrome 90 defaulting to SSL as standard, add one more reason. Sites that cling on to plain HTTP will find a little more load time from the biggest browser on the planet.

Remember SSL is always 100% free for 34SP.com hosted sites, and we’ll hold your hand with the installation and any issues along the way. There’s really no reason not to make the move. Here are the full details on our SSL setup and how to get going.

Comments

There are 3 comments on “Chrome using https as default

  1. Roger Manser April 28, 2021

    Too many abbreviations to understand what you are saying… Probably it is important, but all gobblegook…. ssl and http and https… write for the layman, please.

    Reply
    • Stuart Melling May 12, 2021

      Hi Roger. SSL is what creates the padlock in your browser when reading a website. It ensures the back and forth data between site and user is encrypted end to end. If you need any help or advice here, just drop us a line to support@34sp.com so we can help.

      Reply
  2. David Ledger April 28, 2021

    Enforcing https is reasonable for viewing public sites, but why do browsers insist on htts when connecting to a web server on an unroutable local network address? If a website is on a local network and not accessible from the world at large why enforce https. It’s easy to detect and can be a pain to work around.

    Reply